Anxiety is the most common mental health issue among college-aged individuals.  According to a 2013 survey conducted by the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors, 41.6 percent of college students struggle with anxiety.  To many students, maintaining a balance between schoolwork, a social life, extracurriculars, a job and more sometimes seems impossible.

Anxiety is the most common mental health issue among college-aged individuals.  According to a 2013 survey conducted by the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors, 41.6 percent of college students struggle with anxiety.  To many students, maintaining a balance between schoolwork, a social life, extracurriculars, a job and more sometimes seems impossible.

 When describing college, some make it seem like a dreamland of sudden friendships, never-ending parties and activities and some studying along the way.  College, however, can be a major source of loneliness and hopelessness.  According to a study published by Appalachian State, Yale, University of Pennsylvania and Tulane researchers in 2016, around 60 percent of college students reported feeling lonely in the past year.

When describing college, some make it seem like a dreamland of sudden friendships, never-ending parties and activities and some studying along the way.  College, however, can be a major source of loneliness and hopelessness.  According to a study published by Appalachian State, Yale, University of Pennsylvania and Tulane researchers in 2016, around 60 percent of college students reported feeling lonely in the past year.

 Party culture is often seen as central to the "college experience", but this culture often leads to binge drinking, a behavior consisting of consuming large amounts of alcohol in short time spans, characteristic of many (often underage) students on college campuses.  According to 2014 data from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, over 1,800 students die from alcohol-related causes per year.   Another almost 600 thousand students suffer alcohol-related injuries and nearly 100 thousand are victims of alcohol-related sexual assault.

Party culture is often seen as central to the "college experience", but this culture often leads to binge drinking, a behavior consisting of consuming large amounts of alcohol in short time spans, characteristic of many (often underage) students on college campuses.  According to 2014 data from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, over 1,800 students die from alcohol-related causes per year.   Another almost 600 thousand students suffer alcohol-related injuries and nearly 100 thousand are victims of alcohol-related sexual assault.

 The transition between high school and college and added stress of an increased workload and life pace can create the feeling of losing control, leading some students to attempt to control their body and physical appearance.  According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD), people ages 12 to 25 comprise 95 percent of those with eating disorders.  ANAD also found that 91 percent of college-aged women try to control their appearance by restricting their diets.

The transition between high school and college and added stress of an increased workload and life pace can create the feeling of losing control, leading some students to attempt to control their body and physical appearance.  According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD), people ages 12 to 25 comprise 95 percent of those with eating disorders.  ANAD also found that 91 percent of college-aged women try to control their appearance by restricting their diets.

 For some college students, the urge to excel extends into abusing drugs and stimulants in an attempt to study a bit later or focus a bit more.  According to research by the Clinton Foundation, the use of stimulants (such as Adderall) increased 93 percent on college campuses between 1993 and 2005.  The 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services found 21.3 percent of adults ages 18 to 25 used illicit drugs.

For some college students, the urge to excel extends into abusing drugs and stimulants in an attempt to study a bit later or focus a bit more.  According to research by the Clinton Foundation, the use of stimulants (such as Adderall) increased 93 percent on college campuses between 1993 and 2005.  The 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services found 21.3 percent of adults ages 18 to 25 used illicit drugs.

 For some college students, the urge to excel extends into abusing drugs and stimulants in an attempt to study a bit later or focus a bit more.  According to research by the Clinton Foundation, the use of stimulants (such as Adderall) increased 93 percent on college campuses between 1993 and 2005.  The 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services found 21.3 percent of adults ages 18 to 25 used illicit drugs.

For some college students, the urge to excel extends into abusing drugs and stimulants in an attempt to study a bit later or focus a bit more.  According to research by the Clinton Foundation, the use of stimulants (such as Adderall) increased 93 percent on college campuses between 1993 and 2005.  The 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services found 21.3 percent of adults ages 18 to 25 used illicit drugs.

 Anxiety is the most common mental health issue among college-aged individuals.  According to a 2013 survey conducted by the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors, 41.6 percent of college students struggle with anxiety.  To many students, maintaining a balance between schoolwork, a social life, extracurriculars, a job and more sometimes seems impossible.
 When describing college, some make it seem like a dreamland of sudden friendships, never-ending parties and activities and some studying along the way.  College, however, can be a major source of loneliness and hopelessness.  According to a study published by Appalachian State, Yale, University of Pennsylvania and Tulane researchers in 2016, around 60 percent of college students reported feeling lonely in the past year.
 Party culture is often seen as central to the "college experience", but this culture often leads to binge drinking, a behavior consisting of consuming large amounts of alcohol in short time spans, characteristic of many (often underage) students on college campuses.  According to 2014 data from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, over 1,800 students die from alcohol-related causes per year.   Another almost 600 thousand students suffer alcohol-related injuries and nearly 100 thousand are victims of alcohol-related sexual assault.
 The transition between high school and college and added stress of an increased workload and life pace can create the feeling of losing control, leading some students to attempt to control their body and physical appearance.  According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD), people ages 12 to 25 comprise 95 percent of those with eating disorders.  ANAD also found that 91 percent of college-aged women try to control their appearance by restricting their diets.
 For some college students, the urge to excel extends into abusing drugs and stimulants in an attempt to study a bit later or focus a bit more.  According to research by the Clinton Foundation, the use of stimulants (such as Adderall) increased 93 percent on college campuses between 1993 and 2005.  The 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services found 21.3 percent of adults ages 18 to 25 used illicit drugs.
 For some college students, the urge to excel extends into abusing drugs and stimulants in an attempt to study a bit later or focus a bit more.  According to research by the Clinton Foundation, the use of stimulants (such as Adderall) increased 93 percent on college campuses between 1993 and 2005.  The 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services found 21.3 percent of adults ages 18 to 25 used illicit drugs.

Anxiety is the most common mental health issue among college-aged individuals.  According to a 2013 survey conducted by the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors, 41.6 percent of college students struggle with anxiety.  To many students, maintaining a balance between schoolwork, a social life, extracurriculars, a job and more sometimes seems impossible.

When describing college, some make it seem like a dreamland of sudden friendships, never-ending parties and activities and some studying along the way.  College, however, can be a major source of loneliness and hopelessness.  According to a study published by Appalachian State, Yale, University of Pennsylvania and Tulane researchers in 2016, around 60 percent of college students reported feeling lonely in the past year.

Party culture is often seen as central to the "college experience", but this culture often leads to binge drinking, a behavior consisting of consuming large amounts of alcohol in short time spans, characteristic of many (often underage) students on college campuses.  According to 2014 data from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, over 1,800 students die from alcohol-related causes per year.   Another almost 600 thousand students suffer alcohol-related injuries and nearly 100 thousand are victims of alcohol-related sexual assault.

The transition between high school and college and added stress of an increased workload and life pace can create the feeling of losing control, leading some students to attempt to control their body and physical appearance.  According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD), people ages 12 to 25 comprise 95 percent of those with eating disorders.  ANAD also found that 91 percent of college-aged women try to control their appearance by restricting their diets.

For some college students, the urge to excel extends into abusing drugs and stimulants in an attempt to study a bit later or focus a bit more.  According to research by the Clinton Foundation, the use of stimulants (such as Adderall) increased 93 percent on college campuses between 1993 and 2005.  The 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services found 21.3 percent of adults ages 18 to 25 used illicit drugs.

For some college students, the urge to excel extends into abusing drugs and stimulants in an attempt to study a bit later or focus a bit more.  According to research by the Clinton Foundation, the use of stimulants (such as Adderall) increased 93 percent on college campuses between 1993 and 2005.  The 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services found 21.3 percent of adults ages 18 to 25 used illicit drugs.

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